USA Junior Hockey Magazine December 2009 : Page 19

December 2009 • 19 NEW JERSEY TITANS www.jrtitans.com By Steve Stein Andrew Ball wants to be a New Jer- sey state trooper or perhaps an FBI agent someday. In the meantime, he’s patrol- ling the red line for the New Jersey Ju- nior Titans. Ball is a 6-foot, 194-pound defense- man who can be physical or use finesse to break up opponents’ offensive efforts, and jump into an offensive rush for his team when needed. “That’s why I like playing defense,” he said. “Your job is to keep the puck out of your own net, but if you want to score, there are opportunities to do that, too.” This is Ball’s first year of junior hock- ey. He formerly was a defenseman for the Brick Township (N.J.) High School hockey team and in the Brick Hockey Club program. He said the transition to junior hock- ey and the Metropolitan Junior Hockey League was challenging at first, but he feels he’s catching on quickly. “The biggest difference I’ve noticed is every team in junior hockey is good,” he said. “You have to be on your game and focused all the time.” Ball, 19, is taking classes at Ocean County College, a community college in Toms River, N.J., while he plays for the Junior Titans. As for his collegiate hockey future, he hopes playing junior hockey will land him a spot on a club team at a Division 1 school, or on a Division 3 team. Junior Titans coach Dustin DePalma said Ball fits in well with the team be- cause the Junior Titans like having older, first-year junior players on their roster. “Andrew is doing a good job for us,” DePalma said. BAY STATE BREAKERS www.jrbreakers.com South commits to Robert Morris University Bay State Breakers forward Colin South committed to attend Robert Mor- ris University for the fall of 2010. Robert Morris, located in Pittsburgh, Pa., competes at the Division 1 level in the College Hockey America conference and will join the Atlantic Hockey League next season. Colin is a 6-foot-1-inch, 195-pound left shot forward who has 18 points in 17 games so far this season, playing along- side Ben Murphy and Adam Mitchell (RIT 2010). “Playing Division 1 college hockey has always been a dream of mine and now I will be able to realize that dream when I attend Robert Morris University next fall,” said South. “I am very excited to further my hockey career along with my education. I am also excited to play with my brother, Furman South [a Bay State alumnus], on the same team and havemy parents in the stands each night.” “Colin is a big part of our team. He adds offense and accountability to our line-up,” said Breakers head coach David McCauley. “I am very excited for Colin and the South family that both boys are close to home [Sewickley, Pa.] playing Division 1 college hockey.” Colin South went on to say that Mc- Cauley helped him through the college selection process. “Playing for Bay State has given me the opportunity to realize my dream of playing college hockey,” he said. “Coach McCauley and the rest of the Bay State staff have been nothing but great to me.” Continued from page 13 Tom Smith, right, and Travis Roy get together during the fundraiser held at Prince Pizza in Saugus, Mass., for Smith and his family. Smith was paralyzed after breaking vertebrae in an on-ice accident dur- ing a practice with the Boston Jr. Bulldogs on Oct. 1. Photo by Chris Muise/Pingreephotos.com Former Bulldog Tucker Mullin, now playing for St. Anselm College, had shirts printed up for all attendees, thanks to the Andover Hockey Shop, where he works. The shirts said “Get Up, Stand Up.” Possibly the most emotional moment was when Travis Roy spoke to the crowd. Roy,who has been paralyzed from the neck down since 1995 when he was injured on his first shift for Boston University, has be- come good friends with Smith through the latter’s ordeal. “He came to see me before I came out of the hospital. I asked him ‘How did you overcome the fact that you had such a promising career and it got ripped away?’” said Smith. “That’s a bond, something we unfortunately share, but we have formed quite the relationship. He’s helped me over- come the fact that I’ll never play competi- tive hockey again.” By Smith’s side throughout the last two years, along with all the above-mentioned people, has been Jr. Bulldogs general man- ager Mike Addesa. “I signed a contract with him in May of 2008. I came in as a player, and now I consider him a best friend and a lifelong friend,” said Smith. “He never fails to call me or send a text to check in. He never wor- ries about himself, he’s always concerned about Tom Smith.” “He might be the most courageous in- dividual I’ve ever met in my life,” Addesa added. “If you have a daughter and the doorbell rings for her, the guy you would hope to be there for her is Tom Smith. He comes from an outstanding family – Diane and Ken, and Chris, are amazing with the strength they’ve had to maintain through this.” With cautious optimism, Tom Smith continues to meet all his therapy and reha- bilitation with an iron detrmination. Similar to how he played on the ice, he just won’t take no for an answer. NEW YORK JR. BOBCATS www.nybobcats.com Ball a defensive anchor for Jersey Titans Rockets games always circled on schedule By Brian Lester As the New York Bobcats continue their chase for another South Division championship in the Atlantic Junior Hockey League, they can’t help but look over their shoulders and see the New Jer- sey Rockets on their heels. The Bobcats and Rockets have been in a tight race for the title all season, and although New York fell 5-3 in a match-up against New Jersey earlier this season, it still holds a slight lead in the standings. The Bobcats were 19-2-1 after 22 games while the Rockets were 15-3-1 af- ter 19 games. New York head coach Ed Galiani spoke highly of the rivalry. “Our games with the Rockets are al- ways great. They are fast-paced with a lot of intensity,” Galiani said. “They are fun to watch and more fun to be a part of. We have a healthy respect for their team be- cause they are well-coached, disciplined and they play hard.” New York has been able to stay in front of the Rockets because of solid play between the pipes. Sal Magliocco and Joe Reagan have anchored the goalie position. Reagan, a 5-foot-10-inch, 200-pound goalie out of Yonkers, N.Y., made 352 saves on the year in 14 appearances. Magliocco, a 5- 10, 160-pound netminder from Roslyn, N.Y., made 234 saves in nine games. “Goaltending has been solid with Joe and Sal, and it’s huge to have two talented goalies,” Galiani said. “They continue to support each other as well as push each other at the levels we need them to be playing at if we are going to be competi- tive in this league.” As for the team as a whole, the Bobcats have continued to take steps forward. “The team has been coming together day by day,” Galiani said. “I feel that we have been playing more consistent from game to game. I would like to see the players improve more in their pre-game preparations as well as improve on their communication on the ice. Communica- tion is a big key to success in our sport.” Galiani expects his team to keep mak- ing forward progress and he wants to make sure the players don’t relax or lose focus simply because they have started the season so well. After all, the Rockets are breathing down the necks of the Bobcats, and that fact alone is incentive enough to keep playing hard the rest of the way. Laughter is the best medicine

New Jersey Titans

Steve Stein

Ball a defensive anchor for Jersey Titans<br /> <br /> Andrew Ball wants to be a New Jersey state trooper or perhaps an FBI agent someday. In the meantime, he’s patrolling the red line for the New Jersey Junior Titans.<br /> <br /> Ball is a 6-foot, 194-pound defenseman who can be physical or use finesse to break up opponents’ offensive efforts, and jump into an offensive rush for his team when needed.<br /> <br /> “That’s why I like playing defense,” he said. “Your job is to keep the puck out of your own net, but if you want to score, there are opportunities to do that, too.” This is Ball’s first year of junior hockey.<br /> <br /> He formerly was a defenseman for the Brick Township (N.J.) High School hockey team and in the Brick Hockey Club program.<br /> <br /> He said the transition to junior hockey and the Metropolitan Junior Hockey League was challenging at first, but he feels he’s catching on quickly.<br /> <br /> “The biggest difference I’ve noticed is every team in junior hockey is good,” he said. “You have to be on your game and focused all the time.” Ball, 19, is taking classes at Ocean County College, a community college in Toms River, N.J., while he plays for the Junior Titans.<br /> <br /> As for his collegiate hockey future, he hopes playing junior hockey will land him a spot on a club team at a Division 1 school, or on a Division 3 team.<br /> <br /> Junior Titans coach Dustin DePalma said Ball fits in well with the team because the Junior Titans like having older, first-year junior players on their roster.<br /> <br /> “Andrew is doing a good job for us,” DePalma said.

New York Jr. Bobcats

Brian Lester

Rockets games always circled on schedule<br /> <br /> As the New York Bobcats continue their chase for another South Division championship in the Atlantic Junior Hockey League, they can’t help but look over their shoulders and see the New Jersey Rockets on their heels.<br /> <br /> The Bobcats and Rockets have been in a tight race for the title all season, and although New York fell 5-3 in a match-up against New Jersey earlier this season, it still holds a slight lead in the standings.<br /> <br /> The Bobcats were 19-2-1 after 22 games while the Rockets were 15-3-1 after 19 games.<br /> <br /> New York head coach Ed Galiani spoke highly of the rivalry.<br /> <br /> “Our games with the Rockets are always great. They are fast-paced with a lot of intensity,” Galiani said. “They are fun to watch and more fun to be a part of. We have a healthy respect for their team because they are well-coached, disciplined and they play hard.” New York has been able to stay in front of the Rockets because of solid play between the pipes.<br /> <br /> Sal Magliocco and Joe Reagan have anchored the goalie position. Reagan, a 5-foot-10-inch, 200-pound goalie out of Yonkers, N.Y., made 352 saves on the year in 14 appearances. Magliocco, a 5- 10, 160-pound netminder from Roslyn,<br /> <br /> N. Y., made 234 saves in nine games.<br /> <br /> “Goaltending has been solid with Joe and Sal, and it’s huge to have two talented goalies,” Galiani said. “They continue to support each other as well as push each other at the levels we need them to be playing at if we are going to be competitive in this league.” As for the team as a whole, the Bobcats have continued to take steps forward.<br /> <br /> “The team has been coming together day by day,” Galiani said. “I feel that we have been playing more consistent from game to game. I would like to see the players improve more in their pre-game preparations as well as improve on their communication on the ice. Communication is a big key to success in our sport.” Galiani expects his team to keep making forward progress and he wants to make sure the players don’t relax or lose focus simply because they have started the season so well.<br /> <br /> After all, the Rockets are breathing down the necks of the Bobcats, and that fact alone is incentive enough to keep playing hard the rest of the way.

Bay State Breakers

South commits to Robert Morris University<br /> <br /> Bay State Breakers forward Colin South committed to attend Robert Morris University for the fall of 2010.<br /> <br /> Robert Morris, located in Pittsburgh, Pa., competes at the Division 1 level in the College Hockey America conference and will join the Atlantic Hockey League next season.<br /> <br /> Colin is a 6-foot-1-inch, 195-pound left shot forward who has 18 points in 17 games so far this season, playing alongside Ben Murphy and Adam Mitchell (RIT 2010).<br /> <br /> “Playing Division 1 college hockey has always been a dream of mine and now I will be able to realize that dream when I attend Robert Morris University next fall,” said South. “I am very excited to further my hockey career along with my education. I am also excited to play with my brother, Furman South [a Bay State alumnus], on the same team and have my parents in the stands each night.” “Colin is a big part of our team. He adds offense and accountability to our line-up,” said Breakers head coach David McCauley. “I am very excited for Colin and the South family that both boys are close to home [Sewickley, Pa.] playing Division 1 college hockey.” Colin South went on to say that Mc- Cauley helped him through the college selection process.<br /> <br /> “Playing for Bay State has given me the opportunity to realize my dream of playing college hockey,” he said. “Coach McCauley and the rest of the Bay State staff have been nothing but great to me.”

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